Month: October 2018

Let’s Party like it’s Halloween!

Okay Folks, we all know today is Halloween, or All Hallows Eve, which is the evening before the day of the dead or, if you are Christian, All Saints Day. Either way, saint or sinner, spooky things are about to take place tonight, and you’re invited to answer a few simple questions to gain entry into the haunted house of horror: Name something you wouldn’t want to meet in a dark forest, or abandoned building at night. Do you believe in vampires, ghouls, and ghosts? Share the spookiest thing that’s ever happened to you. How long do you think you would last in a horror movie? What creeps you out the most, Freddy, Jason, or Clowns? Zombie apocalypse, or rise of the werewolves? Love shiny vampires or, stab ’em through the heart with a stake? And here’s my answers: There’s no way I’m running into a dark forest at night! I know what’s waiting for me in there: all sorts of scary dudes with dripping fangs, howling at the moon, and brain-eating zombies. Vampires? Maybe …

Let’s Get Definitive

Following on from yesterday’s post on spelling and grammar, I thought to bore you senseless with the Indefinite Article, and Split Infinitives. And who doesn’t want to split their infinitive, right? Unlike the Definite Article The, A and AN refer to someone or something whose precise identity is not specified. And, although they are among the most common words in the English language, confusion still arises as to which should be used when. So here’s a reminder. A is used: (i) before all consonants: a woman, a tree, a rock. (ii) before an aspirated h: a horse, a hero, a humorist. (iii) before the letter u when sounded like ‘you’: a unit, a use, a union. (iv) before a diphthong eu: a European, a eulogy. (v) before words beginning with y: a year, a yellow balloon, a youth. AN is used: (i) before a vowel sound: an animal, an example, an umbrella. (ii) before a mute h: an hour, an honest woman, an historian. A split infinitive occurs when to is separated from the infinitive by …

Let’s Get Specific

NaNoWriMo is coming up on us fast and, for those of us out there who are considering taking the challenge, I thought it would be a good idea to share a few pointers with you all. Primers that you can refer to and or, if you feel so inclined, print out and keep at the ready as a reminder. Today I’m starting with spelling, grammar, and punctuation, things we easily miss and or forget. Spelling First rule of thumb, proofread your work by reading it out loud. Grammar • it’s = it is. • its = belonging to it, used exactly the same way as his or hers. • there = a location, as in: over there, there it is. • their = belonging to them, as in: their house, their car. • they’re = they are, as in: “They’re coming right at us!” • your = belonging to you, as in: your hat, your glove. • you’re = you are, as in “You’re starting to annoy me.” Punctuation • Terminal period and commas inside …