All posts filed under: Articles

Three-Act Story Plotting

The three-act structure is a classic method of storytelling with a clear beginning, middle, and end phase. The second act is typically much longer than the others, and can be treated as two sections divided by a climactic midpoint. The outline below only covers the basics, but you can add as many details as you feel necessary. ACT I : THE BEGINNING Opening Scene Sets the tone for the story and introduces the protagonist. Setup Scenes that introduce the characters’ world, introduce supporting characters, and point to changes to come. Inciting Incident The surprise moment that turns the protagonist’s world upside down and kicks off the main plot. Call to Action How do the characters react to the inciting incident? What choice must the protagonist make? ACT II, PART 1 : THE MIDDLE The Choice How does the protagonist decide to deal with the problem? What are the stakes? Rising Action / Mounting Problems Troubles mount as the conflict kicks into high gear. What keeps the protagonist going? Midpoint / Reversal A surprise event that …

Let’s Get Definitive

Following on from yesterday’s post on spelling and grammar, I thought to bore you senseless with the Indefinite Article, and Split Infinitives. And who doesn’t want to split their infinitive, right? Unlike the Definite Article The, A and AN refer to someone or something whose precise identity is not specified. And, although they are among the most common words in the English language, confusion still arises as to which should be used when. So here’s a reminder. A is used: (i) before all consonants: a woman, a tree, a rock. (ii) before an aspirated h: a horse, a hero, a humorist. (iii) before the letter u when sounded like ‘you’: a unit, a use, a union. (iv) before a diphthong eu: a European, a eulogy. (v) before words beginning with y: a year, a yellow balloon, a youth. AN is used: (i) before a vowel sound: an animal, an example, an umbrella. (ii) before a mute h: an hour, an honest woman, an historian. A split infinitive occurs when to is separated from the infinitive by …

Let’s Get Specific

NaNoWriMo is coming up on us fast and, for those of us out there who are considering taking the challenge, I thought it would be a good idea to share a few pointers with you all. Primers that you can refer to and or, if you feel so inclined, print out and keep at the ready as a reminder. Today I’m starting with spelling, grammar, and punctuation, things we easily miss and or forget. Spelling First rule of thumb, proofread your work by reading it out loud. Grammar • it’s = it is. • its = belonging to it, used exactly the same way as his or hers. • there = a location, as in: over there, there it is. • their = belonging to them, as in: their house, their car. • they’re = they are, as in: “They’re coming right at us!” • your = belonging to you, as in: your hat, your glove. • you’re = you are, as in “You’re starting to annoy me.” Punctuation • Terminal period and commas inside …