All posts tagged: Writing

NaNoWriMo 2018

It’s that time of year again, and, as November fast approaches, and while many are absorbed in Halloween and Blogween Reads, a few of us that also write are planning for NaNoWriMo. For those of you unfamiliar with NaNo (as it’s affectionately known) it’s a month-long writing competition in which you challenge yourself to write 50k words in 30 days. I’ve taken part in NaNoWriMo from the first year it started. That’s not to say I’ve finished each and every year with a completed manuscript. I haven’t. Maybe the first few times I entered, I was intent on achieving the magical 50k. But then I realised I could put NaNo to better use as a means of kick-starting new or languishing projects. The whole point is to make me focus on one story at a time, which is where I have trouble—as an endless ideas machine, I never stop scribbling down plots and scenarios. I have no problems starting a project, but I do have problems focusing on one project at a time, and on …

Bullet Journalling — One notebook to rule them all!

To keep myself organised and, because I love paper and all things stationery, I’ve been a journalist all my life. From writing in little spiral-bound notebooks and school exercise books as a child, right on through to a fancy leather-bound Midori (an expensive Japanese notebook) that was a birthday gift. I’ve been an avid note-maker since I was able to hold a pencil and write. I’ve used all sorts of notebooks to scribble in, and even tried the made for journaling journal by Baron Fig—yes, what a great name! Never mind the journal that everyone seems to hold as sacred, the Leuchtturm1917. But amongst them all, big, small, ruled, dotted or blank, fancy, plain, expensive or cheap. The one I love the most has to be the A5 pocket size Moleskine. I’ve noted everything from lists of movies watched, to books I want to buy, to snippets I want to remember—quotes, sayings and random thoughts—all the things I don’t want to forget. From To-Do lists to complicated weekly and monthly calendars — they’ve all been …

Five Authors I Have Met

Either through work, or via conventions I’ve attended over the years, I’ve been lucky enough to meet a number of authors. It’s one thing to love an author’s work, and to rave on about this or that book. But getting to meet them, in person, and even have that extended moment with them long enough to say more than: ‘I love your work,’ is a huge privilege and yes, priceless. MICHAEL MOORCOCK — Fantasy Way back when I lived and worked in London, I met one of the biggest fantasy authors of his generation, Michael Moorcock, whose work (at the time) I was a huge fan of. If you haven’t read any of his work, you should try: Elric of Melniboné and Other Stories The Jewel in the Skull (Hawkmoon series) The Cornelius Quartet (Jerry Cornelius Series) All books I grew up reading back in the 70s. Moorcock once wrote of himself, “I think of myself as a bad writer with big ideas, but I’d rather be that than a big writer with bad ideas.” …

Stone • Cold • Dead!

I have another WIP and another excerpt chapter to tease you with. Stone Cold Dead is a military-based action thriller that opens with a fire-fight about to go down in Iraq, involving a number of clandestine alphabet agencies. And, as the bullets fly, everyone’s first reaction is to shoot first, and ask questions afterwards. “CIA Agent, Karen Stone, crouched down in the tight confines behind the huge boulder leaning in against the solid safety listening to the Special Forces team leader, Sergeant Johnny ‘Jack’ Daniels, whisper instructions to the rest of the group. Simmons spread out the tactical data across his knees as others peered in over shoulders, scanning the topography on the aerial and hi-res shots. Stone wasn’t a part of their team. Just an observer. An unofficial, official observer. She had supplied the Intel and, as such, had come along for the ride, which was the official line— confirm the kill for the Agency. That was the supposition. At least, as far as the craggy-faced Sergeant Daniels was concerned. But she had her …

Getting A Grip On Crime …

Or, more to the point, learning the art of writing crime fiction. The amazingly talented Crime Thriller Girl, A.K.A. Steph Broadribb, along with a couple of her fellow crime-writing friends—Susi Holliday, AK Benedict, and Louise Voss—have created a website in order to help authors write their first novel. If you would like to know more about what’s on offer, visit them HERE. And while you are at it, why not look them up on Facebook, HERE.